Access to environmental justice


This brings into question the honest and integrity of Theresa May and her statement that her government would be for all. This article casts doubt on her aims; so blatantly at odds with any idea of justice for any but the very wealthy.

UK Human Rights Blog

On Monday 13 March, I went along to the latest Castle Debate, held in conjunctionwith the Environmental Law Foundation: see here for more of the same, all free debates, and fascinating topics for anyone interested in environmental law and policy.

It, and Tom Brenan’s talk in particular, reminded me that, despite it being not long after my last Aarhus post (on private law proceedings, here), it was time to set out the latest rules governing judicial reviews, which came into operation on 28 February. The bone of contention, as ever, is the concept that challenging environmental decisions should not be prohibitively expensive.  

Until last month, the rules were relatively simple, and were designed, for better or for worse, to minimise the amounts of arguments about costs in environmental challenges. If you were an individual, £5,000 capped the costs which you would have to pay the other side…

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