Seven Things You May Not Know About Punctuation


Recommended reading, with reservations to stick to the rules for the sake of your readers’ sanity.

Interesting Literature

In this special guest post, Ana Sampson offers some little-known facts about punctuation marks, to mark the publication of Caroline Taggart’s new book, The Accidental Apostrophe: … And Other Misadventures in Punctuation

Did you know

1. The Victorians were crazy about hyphens?

Jane Austen’s nephew Edward Austen Leigh, composing a biography of his aunt in the 1860s, had occasion to mention the joys of spring in the country, including early primroses, anemones and the first bird’s-nest. That hyphen makes it absolutely clear that he means the first nest (of the season) belonging to a bird, rather than a nest belonging to the first bird. A bit over-precise by today’s standards, you might think.

2. Charles Dickens could work six semi-colons into a single sentence?

It’s right at the beginning of Great Expectations, and it’s a masterpiece:

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