Undercover police officers: how far does their legal liability go?


It is sickening to read the excuses made on behalf of the impostor. They read like a horror story and ensure the police will have a place in the annals of eternal dishonour.

UK Human Rights Blog

TBS v Metropolitan Police Commissioner [2017] EWHC 3094 – read judgment

The High Court has refused an application to strike out a claim in negligence and misfeasance in public office taken by someone born as a result of a liaison between an activist in the animal liberation movement and a man who subsequently turned out to be an undercover police officer.

Although this is not a full trial of the merits, the ruling from Nicol J triangulates on very interesting questions relating to “wrongful life” claims, legal duties owed by people in public office, and the predictability of harm as well as the identity of potential victims. It also touches on the character of psychiatric harm, and how difficult it is to identify the point at which it can legitimately be said to arise. Whatever the results of the ultimate litigation, the arguments here raise sharp questions of public policy…

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