Prime Minister Theresa May And Other Controversial Figures Set To Make Huge Profits From Cannabis Legislation.


This particular story in the news suggests that too many politicians have too many vested interests in large business enterprises and despite the legal implications, they choose not to disclose them for public scrutiny.

Theresa May, like many of her fellow politicians, chooses not to reveal too much about family connections or the sources of family wealth, but when it involves the Prime Minister and national policy, I think we have the right to know.

The outcome of the latest cannabis fiasco has involved the Home Office as well as the Ministry of Health and brought shame to both. One suspects pressure was ultimately brought to bear and stubborn prejudice was forced to give way to common-sense because of increasingly adverse publicity. A spectacle that does not inspire confidence in the current government – nor its wisdom in giving credence to its advisors or civil servants.

via Prime Minister Theresa May And Other Controversial Figures Set To Make Huge Profits From Cannabis Legislation.

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It seems the fabrication and invention of evidence is not restricted to any one society or country. There are always lies, damned lies and statistics. Why does society tolerate this when it comes to the justice system?

Perhaps we are all too civilised when it comes to doling out the justice that such base behaviour deserves. We are so busy observing all the ethics and niceties, we fail to concern ourselves with the gross injustice being done to the victims.

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MAURICE KIRK: Disgraceful: WILL THIS BE ANOTHER UNLAWFUL DEATH IN CUSTODY? – MAURICE KIRK CALL FROM HMP PARC 07 JUNE 2018 – hospital appointment denied 08 June 2018 + archive


How can this behaviour be justified in Britain in 2018? Surely someone somewhere must recognise the injustice of this victimisation of a very old man while in prison on a trumped-up charge based on trumped-up evidence from very questionable sources?

via MAURICE KIRK: Disgraceful: WILL THIS BE ANOTHER UNLAWFUL DEATH IN CUSTODY? – MAURICE KIRK CALL FROM HMP PARC 07 JUNE 2018 – hospital appointment denied 08 June 2018 + archive

New Guidelines Urge Courts To Jail Sex Offenders and Domestic Abusers Who Breach Orders


I am also concerned about some of the wrongful accusations that have appeared in the news and their consequences on the lives of those who become victims of unjustified accusations. It suggests that a certain amount of anonymity should be allowed initially; both to the accused, as well as to the accuser, until guilt has been established beyond reasonable doubt.

I’m not sure prison is the solution for such offenders, although the offence, if proved, deserves a serious penalty and one that will serve as a real deterrent. Perhaps humiliation through unwanted publicity or curfew and tagging to restrict freedom of movement as well as the imposition of a huge fine might suffice.

The latter might be taken directly from wages or salary over a period commensurate with a prison sentence as long as the physical threat posed could be completely neutralized. So far, only a prison sentence can guarantee that – and it is the threat of violation that is most intimidating for the victim.

Of course, at the end of the sentence, the threat of violation could start again when the offender is freed. Prison cannot guarantee a cure so the conundrum remains for no one can have the perfect answer.

via New Guidelines Urge Courts To Jail Sex Offenders and Domestic Abusers Who Breach Orders

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The European Court of Justice has just ruled that EU law does not limit child contact rights solely to parents, but that it also includes grandparents.

Perhaps there is already too much bureaucratic interference and too little common-sense being applied by officials in their dealings with the everyday lives of ordinary people, so yet more of the same might not be welcome, but though the nuclear family’s parameters may have changed, the needs of children to be nurtured have not.

It would be normal for grandparents to figure in the lives of their grandchildren, so giving access to grandparents with grandchildren in care should be considered – as long as the existing relationship between grandparents and grandchildren is harmonious. Such access should not increase the possibility of bringing more stress to an already stressful situation.

Sadly, it is here that we would have to rely on human judgment and so risk human error or bias. Too often we adults, however well-meaning, perceive what we think others need, without being truly objective in our final analysis – and this is where social workers would be required to apply their finest qualities of analysis and judgement to each individual for whom they are responsible.

In these situations, support for the adults involved is as important as that offered to each child. Still not enough training and on-going training and support is currently being offered to those working in our social services; too often it is the recourse of graduates who are undecided about what exactly they want to do with their university degree once they have it.

It is fairly typical of those who wander into university from their school’s the sixth form , without a clear plan about their future, other than that their parents are keen for them to go to university. Or so it was – before the introduction of fees, mounting student debt and the current unemployment situation among graduates.

It was once commonplace for children, without a definite plan for their future, to opt for the civil service because it was regarded as ‘safe’. Then it was social services that became the ‘safe’ magnet for the undecided; the need for dedication and training was not recognised by all those in authority until comparatively recently, thanks to some dedicated free-thinkers and therapists over the last twenty years or so.

Not enough people have been convinced of the need – and even fewer trained – to deal with the intricate and diar problems of an increasing number of children and young people with special needs. Until we do recognise – and learn to respect the very special people needed to care for those with special needs – the situation can only get worse. Working through the traumas of a broken home; broken or violent relationships; special physical and/or mental needs requires specialist training of the very highest quality – and so far, our Establishment figures have not got the message.

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